Issues Affecting American Indians in Tennessee
This message board is provided as a public service for the specific purpose of sharing and discussing any and all issues that directly or indirectly pertain to Native American Indians living in Tennessee.
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American Indians in Tennessee government volunteer service
TN Archaeological Advisory Council
mandated 3 Native American representatives
  • Michael Lynch, West Tennessee (2008-12)
         member, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
  • Pat Cummins, Middle Tennessee (2004-08)
         descendant, Cherokee
  • Mark Cantrell, Middle Tennessee (2010-14)
         unknown tribal affiliation
  •   TN Historical Commission
    mandated inclusion of person/s
    of Native American ancestry

  • Brent A. Cox (2008-2012)
    444 Cades Atwood Road
    Milan, Tennessee 38358
    731-723-9994

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    TN Commission of Indian Affairs
    Website of the (defunct) TCIA * History of the 1st & 2nd TNCIA

    Greene (CNO) v. TCIA   filed 30 June 2010
    Commission terminated     30 June 2010


    Issues Affecting American Indians in Tennessee


    Issues Affecting American Indians in Tennessee
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    Have fun in the snow?

    Good to see you-- We had about 4 inches of snow here, but it's already melting--almost gone.

    Re: Have fun in the snow?

    Donna D
    Good to see you-- We had about 4 inches of snow here, but it's already melting--almost gone.


    Snow? LOL We didn't have any snow this last go-around; only the time before that and what was piled up (scraped up), is still hanging in.

    I cannot WAIT for SPRING to get here: sunshine and WARM!!!

    Re: Have fun in the snow?

    They're saying we might get 2 more inches tonight. Wow, if so, It might just be a new record--2 snows 2 days apart!

    Re: Have fun in the snow? NO!

    well i got home from work around 11:30pm last night and went to bed around 3am - no snow but they'd been predicting it would start around dark and last through the morning.

    was woke up this morning by hubby who had to show me the snow that had fallen overnight.mguess it was around 9am and there was about 4 inches out there!

    dunno about anyone else but i'm about tired of the snow! all things considered though, it's better than what the northeast has had! Glad i don't live there anymore!!

    Re: The Chikamaka Band wishes to notify our community that

    Chikamaka Band
    The Grundy County Herald, Thursday, February 4, 2010 - 9A

    Chikamaka Band

    The Chikamaka Band wishes to notify our community that the Tennessee Commission of Indian Affairs has approved the criteria for Recognition of American Indian Nations, Tribes and Communities. This is a significant event in the life of Tennessee Indigenous American Indians.

    Historically, Tennessee has been the home to several First Nations peoples. Yet, since the Trail of Tears when members of the Muscogee (Creek) and associated tribes, the Chickasaw, the Shawnee, the Seminole and the Cherokee were migrated West, Tennessee First Nations, Tennessee Indigenous American Indians, have lived in relative obscurity. That American Indians who did not move west and made no special agreement with the Federal Government were denied the right to own land contributed to acknowledging American Indian Heritage.

    The Citizenship Act of 1924 gave American Indians the opportunity to become citizens. This information was not actually communicated to the American Indians. Since American Indians did not know that the potential of losing their land had been removed, they, we, continued to hide our identities as American Indian. American Indians, we, did, however, continue to maintain community involvement, cultural connections and historic leadership though hidden from the people outside of our communities.

    In l794, an expedition led by Major Ore destroyed the Chikamaka towns of Nickajack and Running Water and killed many of their inhabitants. The survivors fled to the hills and coves of the South Cumberland Plateau, which was to be their “final stronghold.” They vowed to either be allowed to live there in peace or die. Their primary goal was to hold on to the land at all cost. This goal was accomplished with much personal loss. The Chikamaka are people descended from these.

    Today the Chikamaka Band is seeking to continue its historic traditions and bring economic and social development to its people and the region. However, Federal law has mandated that American Indians in these United States of America be recognized as such to be classified as such. One indicator of this was the Indian Arts arid Crafts Act of 1990, which prohibits marketing of Indian arts and crafts products within the United States by non-American Indians. Due to this law it is illegal to offer or display for sale, or sell any art or craft product which is not produced by a Recognized American Indian or Indian Tribe. For a first time violation of the Act, an individual can face civil or criminal penalties up to a $250,000 fine or a 5-year prison term, or both. If a business violates the Act, it can face civil penalties or can be prosecuted and fined up to $1,000,000;

    The recognition criteria approved by the Tennessee Commission of Indian Affairs the Chikamaka Band the opportunity to seek to enable its people to achieve actualization and suffrage within the American Indian Community.

    For more information on Tennessee Commission of Indian Affairs go to http://state.tn.us/environment/boards/tcia. For more information on Chikamaka Band go to http://ChikamakaBand.com or write to P.O. Box 998, Tracy City, TN 37387 or phone 931-952-6563 or fax 615-523-1479.
    Ok do this mean another group of fake injuns who want money to do what make cheap fake junk and need the ID from who another bunch of wannabes, but let me not the one to say WTF pero son *******s short for FOOLS ok


    TN & American Indian Related Links
  • Tennessee Legislature
  • Tennessee Executive Branch
  • Federal Government Links
  • Tennessee.gov
  • TN Attorney General
  • TnCIA official website

  • Native American Indian Association of Tennessee (NAIA)
    Advisory Council on Tennessee Indian Affairs (ACTIA)
    Alliance for Native American Indian Rights (ANAIR)
    Tennessee Native American Convention (TNNAC)
    Tennessee Trail of Tears Association (TnTOTA)
    Tn Commission of Indian Affairs (Unofficial)
    Chattanooga InterTribal Association (CITA)
    InterTribal Sacred Land Trust (ITSLT)
    The Forum
    Tanasi Journal
    Native Nashville
    TN Indian Affairs Blog
    Chikamaka History Timeline
    Mundo Hispano/Hispanic World
    Tennessee Ancient Sites Conservancy
    Indian Burial & Sacred Grounds Watch



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