Issues Affecting American Indians in Tennessee
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American Indians in Tennessee government volunteer service
TN Archaeological Advisory Council
mandated 3 Native American representatives
  • Michael Lynch, West Tennessee (2008-12)
         member, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma
  • Pat Cummins, Middle Tennessee (2004-08)
         descendant, Cherokee
  • Mark Cantrell, Middle Tennessee (2010-14)
         unknown tribal affiliation
  •   TN Historical Commission
    mandated inclusion of person/s
    of Native American ancestry

  • Brent A. Cox (2008-2012)
    444 Cades Atwood Road
    Milan, Tennessee 38358
    731-723-9994

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    Issues Affecting American Indians in Tennessee


    Issues Affecting American Indians in Tennessee
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    No time for resting on our laurels! Bush's last push to deregulate!!

    http://www.truthout.org/103108A

    A Last Push to Deregulate
    Friday 31 October 2008
    by: R. Jeffrey Smith, The Washington Post


    White House to ease many rules.

    The White House is working to enact a wide array of federal regulations, many of which would weaken government rules aimed at protecting consumers and the environment, before President Bush leaves office in January.

    The new rules would be among the most controversial deregulatory steps of the Bush era and could be difficult for his successor to undo. Some would ease or lift constraints on private industry, including power plants, mines and farms.


    Those and other regulations would help clear obstacles to some commercial ocean-fishing activities, ease controls on emissions of pollutants that contribute to global warming, relax drinking-water standards and lift a key restriction on mountaintop coal mining.

    Once such rules take effect, they typically can be undone only through a laborious new regulatory proceeding, including lengthy periods of public comment, drafting and mandated reanalysis.

    "They want these rules to continue to have an impact long after they leave office," said Matthew Madia, a regulatory expert at OMB Watch, a nonprofit group critical of what it calls the Bush administration's penchant for deregulating in areas where industry wants more freedom. He called the coming deluge "a last-minute assault on the public . . . happening on multiple fronts."

    White House spokesman Tony Fratto said: "This administration has taken extraordinary measures to avoid rushing regulations at the end of the term. And yes, we'd prefer our regulations stand for a very long time -- they're well reasoned and are being considered with the best interests of the nation in mind."

    As many as 90 new regulations are in the works, and at least nine of them are considered "economically significant" because they impose costs or promote societal benefits that exceed $100 million annually. They include new rules governing employees who take family- and medical-related leaves, new standards for preventing or containing oil spills, and a simplified process for settling real estate transactions.

    While it remains unclear how much the administration will be able to accomplish in the coming weeks, the last-minute rush appears to involve fewer regulations than Bush's predecessor, Bill Clinton, approved at the end of his tenure.

    In some cases, Bush's regulations reflect new interpretations of language in federal laws. In other cases, such as several new counterterrorism initiatives, they reflect new executive branch decisions in areas where Congress -- now out of session and focused on the elections -- left the president considerable discretion.

    The burst of activity has made this a busy period for lobbyists who fear that industry views will hold less sway after the elections. The doors at the New Executive Office Building have been whirling with corporate officials and advisers pleading for relief or, in many cases, for hastened decision making.

    According to the Office of Management and Budget's regulatory calendar, the commercial scallop-fishing industry came in two weeks ago to urge that proposed catch limits be eased, nearly bumping into National Mining Association officials making the case for easing rules meant to keep coal slurry waste out of Appalachian streams. A few days earlier, lawyers for kidney dialysis and biotechnology companies registered their complaints at the OMB about new Medicare reimbursement rules. Lobbyists for customs brokers complained about proposed counterterrorism rules that require the advance reporting of shipping data.

    Bush's aides are acutely aware of the political risks of completing their regulatory work too late. On the afternoon of Bush's inauguration, Jan. 20, 2001, his chief of staff issued a government-wide memo that blocked the completion or implementation of regulations drafted in the waning days of the Clinton administration that had not yet taken legal effect.

    "Through the end of the Clinton administration, we were working like crazy to get as many regulations out as possible," said Donald R. Arbuckle, who retired in 2006 after 25 years as an OMB official. "Then on Sunday, the day after the inauguration, OMB Director Mitch Daniels called me in and said, 'Let's pull back as many of these as we can.' "

    Clinton's appointees wound up paying a heavy price for procrastination. Bush's team was able to withdraw 254 regulations that covered such matters as drug and airline safety, immigration and indoor air pollutants. After further review, many of the proposals were modified to reflect Republican policy ideals or scrapped altogether.

    Seeking to avoid falling victim to such partisan tactics, White House Chief of Staff Joshua B. Bolten in May imposed a Nov. 1 government-wide deadline to finish major new regulations, "except in extraordinary circumstances."

    That gives officials just a few more weeks to meet an effective Nov. 20 deadline for the publication of economically significant rules, which take legal effect only after a 60-day congressional comment period. Less important rules take effect after a 30-day period, creating a second deadline of Dec. 20.

    OMB spokeswoman Jane Lee said that Bolten's memo was meant to emphasize the importance of "due diligence" in ensuring that late-term regulations are sound. "We will continue to embrace the thorough and high standards of the regulatory review process," she said.

    As the deadlines near, the administration has begun to issue regulations of great interest to industry, including, in recent days, a rule that allows natural gas pipelines to operate at higher pressures and new Homeland Security rules that shift passenger security screening responsibilities from airlines to the federal government. The OMB also approved a new limit on airborne emissions of lead this month, acting under a court-imposed deadline.

    Many of the rules that could be issued over the next few weeks would ease environmental regulations, according to sources familiar with administration deliberations.

    A rule put forward by the National Marine Fisheries Service and now under final review by the OMB would lift a requirement that environmental impact statements be prepared for certain fisheries-management decisions and would give review authority to regional councils dominated by commercial and recreational fishing interests.

    An Alaska commercial fishing source, granted anonymity so he could speak candidly about private conversations, said that senior administration officials promised to "get the rule done by the end of this month" and that the outcome would be a big improvement.

    Lee Crockett of the Pew Charitable Trusts' Environment Group said the administration has received 194,000 public comments on the rule and protests from 80 members of Congress as well as 160 conservation groups. "This thing is fatally flawed" as well as "wildly unpopular," Crockett said.

    Two other rules nearing completion would ease limits on pollution from power plants, a major energy industry goal for the past eight years that is strenuously opposed by Democratic lawmakers and environmental groups.

    One rule, being pursued over some opposition within the Environmental Protection Agency, would allow current emissions at a power plant to match the highest levels produced by that plant, overturning a rule that more strictly limits such emission increases. According to the EPA's estimate, it would allow millions of tons of additional carbon dioxide into the atmosphere annually, worsening global warming.

    A related regulation would ease limits on emissions from coal-fired power plants near national parks.

    A third rule would allow increased emissions from oil refineries, chemical factories and other industrial plants with complex manufacturing operations.

    These rules "will force Americans to choke on dirtier air for years to come, unless Congress or the new administration reverses these eleventh-hour abuses," said lawyer John Walke of the Natural Resources Defense Council.

    But Scott H. Segal, a Washington lawyer and chief spokesman for the Electric Reliability Coordinating Council, said that "bringing common sense to the Clean Air Act is the best way to enhance energy efficiency and pollution control." He said he is optimistic that the new rule will help keep citizens' lawsuits from obstructing new technologies.

    Jonathan Shradar, an EPA spokesman, said that he could not discuss specifics but added that "we strive to protect human health and the environment." Any rule the agency completes, he said, "is more stringent than the previous one."

    Aaarrrrghhhhhh!

    Dirtier air! More corporate freedom! More corporate tax breaks! You (GWB) are an unpopular lame duck--accept it!

    Lame Duck BushCo Administration - lessons learned

    http://www.theage.com.au/world/us-election-2008/birthday-cake-for-laura-as-bush-party-devastated-20081105-5iiu.html


    Birthday cake for Laura as Bush party devastated

    ---- portions snipped ----

    Mr Bush — who was unpopular with most Americans for most of his second term — lay low during the presidential race out of deference to Republican nominee John McCain and other Republican candidates, who have sought to distance themselves from the Administration.

    Rather than voting at the fire station in Crawford, Texas, as he has for the past three elections, Mr Bush this year sent in a postal vote for Senator McCain.

    ---- portions snipped ----

    _______________________________________________________


    http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/03/opinion/03mon1.html?partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

    Lame Duck Summit
    Published: November 3, 2008


    President Bush will be the lamest of ducks by Nov. 15, when leaders of 20 nations meet in Washington to discuss the global financial crisis. With only two months left in office, he will not be around to implement any policy changes he proposes or agrees to.


    Mr. Bush’s bigger problem is his utter lack of credibility when it comes to the central question of how to regulate national and global financial markets to ensure that this disaster never happens again. Eight years and a huge financial crash later, and Mr. Bush is still extolling the corrective powers of unrestrained markets.

    ------

    read more at the links above

    _____________________________________________________


    http://www.mygtv.net/?p=12375

    Bush To Make Statement In Rose Garden Today


    he's made his little speech - he sounded like he was choking back tears of frustration, imho - and well he should!!!!!! His crocodile tears are NOTHING compared to the tears we've shed during his HORRENDOUS administration!!!!!!

    GOOD BYE - FAREWELL - DON'T let the White House door hit you in your A$$ on your way OUT!!!

    Re: Lame Duck BushCo Administration - lessons learned

    Seconded!

    Forget the duck...

    Bush is more like a lame dick!

    speaking of deregulation!! Mega-phone companies - AGAIN - coming your way

    the story is:

    Centurytel bought Embarq for X-billions of dollars and in exchange for assuming Embarq's X-billions of debt, Embarq now owns something like 65% of Centurytel's stock - so they're a combined company now.

    ?????!!!!!!!!!!

    what the hell is THAT all about, you ask?!

    http://www.fcc.gov/headlines.html

    The FCC is about to 'decide' - today or tomorrow - that the BIG phone companies (ATT, etc.) will be allowed to buy up and run out the smaller phone companies like Centurytel and Embarq.

    Ummmm .... what the hell happened to stopping such MONOPOLIES?!!

    BuschCO's crap sets me off!!!!!!

    just thought y'all might wanna know ...
    Donna


    ------------------------------------------------------


    http://www.tricities.com/tri/news/local/article/louisiana_company_centurytel_buys_embarq/15608/


    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/business/orl-c3report2808oct28,0,5003737.story?track=rss

    CenturyTel buys Embarq in $5.8B deal
    The combined company will have about 8 million lines spanning 33 states, mainly in rural areas.

    _________________________________________

    http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&q=AT%26T%20to%20restrict%20internet%20usage&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wn

    AT&T Cuts Off Your Internet Addiction
    Minyanville.com, New York - 4 minutes ago
    Those who exceed the limit will be charged an extra $1 per GB ...

    Broadband Caps Coming to AT&T
    Washington Post, United States - 10 hours ago
    Beginning this month, AT&T will restrict new customers in the affected areas based on their Internet plans. ...

    AT&T Begins Testing DSL Bandwidth Limits
    Teleclick.ca, Canada - 2 hours ago
    AT&T’s plan follows a similar rule put in place last month by cable rival, Comcast, which is restricting consumer bandwidth to 250-Gbps per month. ...

    The incredible shrinking Internet
    InfoWorld, CA - 5 hours ago
    Broadband users will have to budget their Internet use without knowing in advance how much of their capacity a particular application uses. ...



    coming soon to YOUR HOME!!


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